Author: Little, Cameron

Top Ten Tips for Happy Bluegrassers
 

The California Bluegrass Association Father's Day Festival is a breathless 27 days away and counting. Here are our top ten festival tips to keep you knee-deep in bluegrass happiness:

1. Use Your Sunscreen
Just do it. Nobody needs a leathery, peeling neck just to prove their redneck-ed-ness. Also good to use on the top of your feet if you're the Birkenstock type.

2. Bring Cash
Not just for my tips, mind you. You'll want cash for the late-night hot dog stand, for purchases big and small, and to snag that new guitar you've been lusting for.

3. Give Yourself Permission
Deconstruct your schedule. Roam the booths, sit in the best seats (when empty), stay out of the sun, cool off with the luthiers, jam in the campground, schmooze with the vendors, take a nap, hang out on the grass, drink in the night. It's a whole festival kind of experience and you deserve it all.

4. Wear sturdy shoes, ladies
I'm not kidding. Most of the lovely womenfolk I know have this one down, but every year we download our entire supply of mole skin, bandaids, and golf cart rides to the clueless fashionistas. Don't be one of them. I'll give you a ride even if you don't have blisters.

5. Goodwill
It's a nice thing to remember that mentors and celebrities always hobnob with us regular folk at bluegrass festivals. At one of my first Father's Day festivals, I was between sets at a side stage, chitchatting with a gentleman and his wife. We were laughing about something and he crossed his legs to reveal a very one-of-a-kind cowboy boot. Well, danged if I wasn't shooting the breeze with the legendary Doyle Lawson. I'd never seen him without a hat and snazzy jacket but man, I'd recognize them boots anywhere!


6. A Canopy for Your Flamingo Lights
Just sayin'. They could be little martini glasses or bass fishes or leg lamps from the "Christmas Story" ("FRA-GEE-LAY. That must be Italian!")

7. Baby Wipes
Okay, okay. Just work with me here. Good for cleaning your feet before you get into bed if nothing else. Great for wiping all the blackberry crumble off your shirt.

8. Bring Earplugs
Seriously. These tiny little pillows of love have saved my sanity at bluegrass and other festivals more times than I can count. Not only do they help insulate you from honking vocals and off-key serenades that sometimes define after-hours in Bluegrass-land, they also let you sit a little closer to the speakers if you need a nose-to-the-glass view of your favorite headliner.

9. Pace Yourself
It's practically a rite of passage to stay up all night at a minimum of one festival in your bluegrassing career. Not too long ago, my pal and I did just that, chugging contraband Starbucks in the wee hours of the morning. I had great plans for the daylight hours that day: volunteer for gate duty, jam in the campground, and catch some main stage acts, especially the Seldom Scene. All of this SOUNDED good at the time. The reality was that after our volunteer shifts, and musicating, we basically crawled to our seats, determined to bask in the glow that is the Seldom Scene. Could I keep my eyes open? No. Did my mom take pictures of me, head all the way back on the lounge chair with my mouth wide open? Oh, yes. Am I ever gonna do that again? No. At least not as long as she has a camera in her hand.

10. Bring your Attitude
Healthy, workable, and playful festival attitudes result from experience but here's a tip Bluegrassers of any stripe can benefit from:

No matter how early or late you get to the campground, you might encounter a "grumpy person" or two. Sometimes folks just need to decompress after a long drive or whatnot, and sometimes a little tizzy is thrown to let off steam. Cocktail hour is often the prescription the doctor ordered, but if you or anyone you encounter needs a little help in this area, just direct them to a staff member. These guys EXIST so you can have a great time and believe me they'll do everything possible to ensure you do. Plus we love using our walkie-talkies because it impresses the girls.
 
Posted:  5/23/2014



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